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's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> welcome back. it is 6:00 here this morning. we are watching hurricane sandy very closely for you this morning. good morning. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm wisdom martin. a very busy morning indeed. tucker barnes will have the latest information as soon as we get it. >> before we talk with him, first the warnings about this storm are being taken very seriously. >> there is a long list of what is closed today. metro is closed today. that includes all rail, bus and metro access service. the federal government is also closed. d.c. government offices or closed as well and so are most schools across it is region. >> for a full list of closures gorks to myfoxdc.com. we are also running all the closures on the top of your screen. -- for a full list of closures, go to myfoxdc.com. >> tucker, can you at least -- i know you are very busy over there. here, we have a picture it was right now. what is the latest on this? >> so, we're now looking
-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
out of that civil rights movement era. she was talking about that no tired message. we can stand in those lines. you give us one day, we'll at that time one day. you give us voter i.d., we'll get an i.d. and i think that message is important. >> thank you to joy reid. and up next, i'll bring my panel back in on this issue of voter suppression and the backlash against it. could it turn out that the republicans have been their own great undoing. er ] take dayquil... [ ding! ] ...and spend time on the slopes. take alka-seltzer plus cold & cough... [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [
in this issue. >> bloomberg called gay marriage a civil rights issue and talked about the economic impact of the marriage equality law in new york, pointing out that more than 8,000 gay and lesbian couple couples have been married in new york city since may of last year. >> we've calculated that same-sex marriage has generated more than $259 million in economic activity in our city. >> the latest polling numbers show a majority of voters in the state support marriage equality. if passed, maryland would be the first state to pass marriage equality at the ballot box. >> i firmly believe the question we face is not if marriage equality will come to all 50 states but simply when and marylanders have a chance to lead the way on election day. >> in baltimore, kai reed, wbal-tv 11 news. >> this election, maryland voters will choose a president and decipher through seven referendum questions, a task that can be challenging but our smartphone app makes the process so much easier. the power of wbal-tv 11's commitment 2012 coverage is at your fingertips. follow live updates from live wires as we cou
blew up his campaign when he gav the libertarian answer on the 1964 civil rights act. suddenly he was tendering on that, john stossel. john: let's play some clips. romney says he ill repeal obamacare. but he wants to keep the popular parts. >> number one, pre-existing conditions are cered under my plan. john: that's popular. no one likes the idea that pre-existing conditions are covered, but that is not insurance, that is welfare. >> this is what our entire segment should beyond. of simply blowing off your obsession with drug legalization. health care. if we did not repeal obamacare in the next few years. john: repeal it but tepee expensive parts. cover the kids. >> 1,000 years of darkness. this is why you have to vote, i don't care if it's mickey mouse. or big bird. [laughter] but romney is far more free market than any recent republican candidates, including george bush. what romney is talking about here is the free-market. and as you say, pre-existing conditions are popular, like big bird. john: if everybody has to cover pre-isting conditions. >> let me finish. no one said ever
? >> i think social issues do mean a great deal to us. when you look at guy marriage as the next civil rights issue of our time. we were seeing if he would take the next step and make it a federal law. when i travel around the country at the end of the day, it is everyone talking about back pocket, money, jobs, employment. >> let's talk about you're talking about pocketbook, talking about economic issues. when you look at the youth vote today, since you've been talking to them, are they more fiscally conservative than perhaps last election, seeing many of them as children of generation x-ers. that generation grew up fiscally challenged and they may have passed some of those ideas to their children. >> that taps into something, yeah. i agree with that. i authentic it explains that we have this sort of entrepreneurial spirit. when i travel around the country, i say what do you want to do when you grow up? a lot of the students i talk to aren't interested -- they are, but they don't talk about being the next lebron james or laid a gaga. they say i would love to be the next steve jobs. it'
have been sent to polls across the country, invited by a number of civil rights groups, including the naacp who says there is an effort to suppress minority at the polls. the group sending the observers, the organization for security and cooperation in europe insisting its people will not interfere or influence elections in any way. some american officials are not taking any chances and guaranteeing that they will not. well, let us pause for a moment to consider what the mayor of somerville, massachusetts, has done. getting -- for getting america is the land of the free, including jealously protected -- protection of our first amendment rights, the mayor of the small city, 76,000 people in massachusetts has decided to outlaw the word illegal in connection with the phrase immigrant. they don't want to upset anybody. i said immigrant and illegal in different phrases. we don't know what he thinks it should be instead. we do know, the mayor has just made support illegal illegal. up next, it is an all-out battle for ohio. both candddates campaigning today. can the election be one anywh
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
says education is the civil rights issue of our generation. as we narrow the the achievement gap went to raise the expectations of students. my wife and nine went all the way through the schools here. i'm more excited today. we came in first place to a half years ago in race to the top. it is one thing to win a competition and we're implementing it. we announced two months ago that for the school year 10,000 more kids were proficient in math than the year before. >> i wanted to speak to the racial difference. >> the other investment we're making which will help african- american kids and -- is the significant commitment to the early childhood education. we will be increasing over the next five years the percentage of high needs kids who are involved in [indiscernible] there is evidence that shows the most effective economic development investment the state could make is in early childhood education. what we're saying is two things. the early childhood centers that were really good, it is not a financially responsible decision to -- we would have freincreasee reimbursement. they have t
. rosa parks took the upper seat in montgomery, alabama. it did not create the civil- rights movement. it was a courageous act, but public opinion had changed before that. and the reason we know that public opinion change first is because rosa parks did the same thing 12 years earlier and nothing happened. in between, african-american soldiers came back from world war ii, southerners came back north with a different set of views, but jackie robinson began to play major-league baseball. the political process caught up later and it took a catalyst to spark the change. right now we are in one of those moments where public opinion is ahead of the political leadership. >> importantly, what rick says about people walking into thoughts and ideologies is true, but on the other hand every poll shows that people want our elected officials to compromise and get things done. that is the message. >> i am accompanying ed miller, from texas. karl rove is single-handedly responsible for turning my mother into an armchair pollster. every other day she calls up and says -- french, obama is up by three.
was a party for civil rights. >> exactly. >> caller: exactly. exactly, so they are trying to even pull something from 40, 50 years ago, to make up for what they don't have now. >> yeah. >> stephanie: david crosby of crosby stills and gnash -- >> what? >> stephanie: right? coming up on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ fruit just got cooler. fruit on one side, cool on the other. new ice breakers duo. a fruity, cool way to break the ice. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ [ inaudible ] ♪ ♪ it's just a good vibration ♪ ♪ it's such a dreamy sensation ♪ >> stephanie: jacki, what are you doing? >> i'm working. >> what are you doing? >> i'm working. i'm coordinating with my fabulous producer lisa on what we're going to do in the news coming up in the next segment. >> stephanie: we're a bad influence. >> we are. >> stephanie: fifty minutes after the hour. that's what we do, we get people in trouble. >> do you know how many bouquets of flowers i have to buy her now. are you aware of all of the maybing up i'm going to h
with opposing the war in chicago, very much part of our civil rights movement. chicago was the most segregated city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. so i had to look the part. to work in fashion. t.j.maxx is such a great place cause i know when i go in there, i'm gonna score. they've got such great deals on all my favorite brands. fashion direct from designers. savings direct to you. t.j.maxx. >>> it is 7:54. let's say hello to our facebook fan of the day. we say hello to brittany wharton. brittany tells us it is her 25th birthday. and all that she asked for was her power to stay on. >> yes. >> we hope it did. >> yes. >> we have an update on it, we hope it did, and for your chance to be tomorrow's fan, log on to the facebook page and leave a comment under brittany's picture. >> i'm assuming that it did. >> i hope it did. >> brittany, if you're watching, if you have power, let us know and let us know which one of those, who of those two women are you in the picture. >> we asked to see how you are experiencing the super storm. >> many of you answer
the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> straight ahead at 8:00, surviving sandy, the east coast shuts down as the deadly superstorm moves closer from school closings to storm surges, we have you covered with live team coverage all morning long. good morning everybody, i'm tony perkins. >> i'm allison seymour. right now, the storm is making its way up the east coast, poised for a district hit on the mid-atlantic tonight. >> in preparation of that, states of emergency have been declared from virginia to massachusetts, and president obama has promised a quick federal response. experts say sandy could impact some 50 million people up and down the east coast. it is already blamed for the deaths of 65 after sweeping through the caribbeans. >> now here at home, officials aren't taking any chances. >> that's because most schools in the region are closed, so is the federal government and the dc city government. you can see the full list of delays scrolling at the top of your screen and online at myfoxdc.
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
, fred. >> all right, gentlemen, this young man, a junior in pennsylvania has filed this civil rights suit because he says he was the one who was violated. a sexual encounter he had with somebody on a ten-day field trip was videotaped. the school ended up suspending him for "inappropriate behavior." so regard, how will he go about saying he was the one who should not be disciplined, but the ones who carried out the videotape. >> this someone was his girlfriend of two years, the last week or day of their trip, they had resolutions, which were surreptitiously recorded by somebody, shades of tyler clemente in rutgers, the student says please help me, do something here. and they do. they suspend him and his girlfriend and the video maker, who has charges pending in juvenile court. in any event, the school district did not step back for a minute, they didn't appreciate or act on what happened here. they acted insanely, and some moron suspended him and his girlfriend. they will pay the price for this one, fred, trust me, this case will end quickly in a confidential settlement. the school wa
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
equality. question 6 strengthens protections for our churches and guarantees the civil right to commit to the one you love. while there are those trying to divide us, presidents obama and clinton stand with us. pastors, business leaders, newspapers, democrats and republicans are all coming together for question 6. because it's about fairness-- treating everyone equal under the law. and who could be against that? (bell ringshi. yes? you know those delicious granola bunches in honey bunches of oats? i love those. we've added more to every box. really? wow! honey bunches of oats. make your day bunches better. would ban all abortions and contraception seemed a bit extreme. so i looked into it. turns out, romney doesn't oppose contraception at all. in fact, he thinks abortion should be an option in cases of rape, incest, or to save a mother's life. this issue's important to me, but i'm more concerned about the debt our children will be left with. i voted for president obama last time, but we just can't afford four more years. [ romney ] i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >>> i love
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
urges revenge against mitt romney. what happened to civility? we'll be right back. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >> gretchen: welcome back everyone. the presidential election just three days away now. can you imagine that both candidates are going from town to town to town to town in those swing states. what are they saying? remember when president obama talked a lot about civility and how we should all be nice to each other and not really say any words that might be negative. >> steve: how is that working out? >> gretchen: yesterday he used a word that was new to his stump speech. he got boos from the audience when he talked about mitt romney but then he said this. >> at the time the republic congress any senate candidate by the name of mitt rom? i. [boos] >> no, no, no. don't
hope you are right. thank you, sir for joining us live on this saturday morning. >> thanks for having me. >> brian: four minutes until the bottom of the hour. so much for civility on the campaign trail eastward either side. revenge on mitt romney? what revenge? i thought this was their first match. >> steve: she tried to sneak a fast ones at the polls but wound up walking out in handcuffs. what did she do? we got details. >> brian: that hair color looks so natural. ♪ there she goes again. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating fr
the civil war. >> you're rolling your eyes, george. >> am i wrong? >> you are and i'll say why. democrats have been losing the white vote constantly since 1964. >> john kerry lost the white vote. >> that's right. 20008, from obama, gets that many white votes. we're trying to explain this difference. now, two possible explanations lot of white people who voted for obama in 2008 watched him govern for four years and said, not so good, let's try someone else. the con fedry theory, in the last four years, became racist. >> that's not my argument at all, george. >> it sounds like it. >> no. i'm pointing out the fact that the white voters changing their minds happen to be in virginia and florida. only two states in the -- let me point out -- southernization of the republican party. they were the only two states in 2008 that violated the rule. >> a statement that's checkable and false. that people -- white people moving away are in those two states. >> and a loft them were republicans. >> look, one more time, this could be ohio, that's where president obama is focusing on, the white male vote in
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
these guys. at the end of the day, the overwhelming majority of guys in civil service are doing just that. obviously, it's politically astute for christie to be doing it, but he's doing it for a reason -- you genuinely believe this is a guy who wants to do right by his people. barack obama, you're seeing a human being there. and the camera doesn't lie. obviously, will this weigh an election -- obviously, it leans clearly for obama, but what i love about this is what you see with these guys is the same what you see with the guys in the streets of hoboken that were affected. i believe people are overwhelmingly are tremendously decent including politicians, and you're seeing that. >> is it too cynical to read all this in? let's be clear. analysis is happening within the washington political bubble. but i think if you're watching on television, you're seeing chris christie doing what he has to do for his state and the president doing what a president does, arriving in a disaster zone offering consolation but also his federal help. >> yeah. that's all true. but it does have a political impact.
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